Reblogging – Sharing the Wealth and Wisdom

English: Solomon's Wealth and Wisdom, as in 1 ...

English: Solomon’s Wealth and Wisdom, as in 1 Kings 3:12-13, illustration from a Bible card published 1896 by the Providence Lithograph Company (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What are your thoughts on reblogging?

These used to be my thoughts:

1. Blogger is feeling lazy today so just reblogged someone else’s hard work and thoughts rather than coming up with their own original post.

2. No one can say anything better than I can.

3. I have wisdom to share, why share the wisdom of others?

Today, my new thoughts on reblogging:

1. There is so much wisdom out there that I am not privy to except by reading other blogs—and I now like to share that wisdom.

2. I do not have all the answers and others have them and deliver them eloquently.

3. Sometimes I reblog just to have the wisdom of other bloggers at my fingertips—on my site, where I can go back and revisit easily.

4. I am learning to share and not have my blog just be about me, me, me. That gets boring. Fast.

I find myself reblogging more and more now. At one time I would not have sullied my blog with the posts of others. Now I consider it an honour to host them on my site. They make it better. Thank you to all those I have reblogged in the past, the present, and those I will reblog in the future. You have opened up my world and made me a better person.

(If you are not part of the blogging world yourself—you may wonder what reblogging is—it is the sharing of other blogger’s posts by transferring their knowledge to your site.)

What are your views on reblogging?

Published in: on September 6, 2013 at 12:41 pm  Comments (44)  
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Are You Your Tagline?

Tagline...

Tagline… (Photo credit: Heartlover1717)

Michelle’s prompt: “Often, our blogs have taglines. But what if humans did, too? What would your tagline be?”

My answers:

My tagline would read much like the explanation of what my blog is about: funny, poignant, serious and quirky. I think these four words sum me up pretty well.

Funny can run the gamut from hilarious to facetious, from drool to waggish, and comical to amusing. These are all facets of the same word and the same person. Sometimes my humour is lame, sometimes it hits the mark. Much like me.

Poignant or tender, emotional, expressive, and heartrending are the lovely sides of this word, but it can also mean sad, heart-breaking and distressing—all of which are parts of me.

Serious. Life can be serious sometimes—sombre, staid, and quiet but also thoughtful. And serious things tend to have significance and honesty. I hope I am these last two things: significant and honest.

Quirky. Without a bit of eccentricity, unpredictability, individuality, and yes even oddness, we would be pretty darn boring. I sometimes think I am a bit boring, but I hide it behind my quirkiness.

Other tag words I would to be associated with are:  loving, kind, smart (hey, we can all dream), steadfastness, dependable, humane, gentle and generous. They may not all apply all the time, but they are my goals.

What would your taglines be?

Published in: on June 19, 2013 at 12:44 pm  Comments (43)  
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Cool is Bliss

 

Michelle, the prompt nazi said this today: “Language evolves. The meaning of a word can shift over time as we use it differently — think of “cool,” “heavy,” or even “literally. Today, give a word an evolutionary push: give a common word a new meaning, explain it to us, and use it in the title of your post.”

No, Michelle, I am not going to do this prompt—but your mention of the word “cool” hit a chord with me.

Cool City Limit

Cool City Limit (Photo credit: jimmywayne)

I love the word “cool”.  I use it all the time. I love that Abed on the series “Community” which my son introduced to me says: “Cool, cool, cool” in response to a variety of situations. It is such an all-encompassing comment in one word. Just think about how often it fits a situation.

According to my handy dandy Thesaurus mysteriously embedded in my laptop Windows Microsoft Word program, cool is supposed to be interchangeable with nifty, groovy, with-it, hip, trendy, and stylish. I beg to differ. Cool is so “cool” it is almost indefinable. The two words that come somewhere close are “excellent” and “okay”— words that seem to be on the opposite ends of the scale, yet in defining cool are not.

Cool expresses pleasure, approval,  and agreement, but at its height it represents: “an admired aesthetic of attitude, comportment, appearance and style” ~ Wikipedia (that source of knowledge I vowed never to use, but utilize unabashedly and surprisingly often as long as I am not doing serious research).

If I were ordered to never use the word “cool” again, I would be rendered speechless in many situations, particularly in commenting on blogs. I use the word often and with heartfelt sincerity. If I ever employ it on your blog—it is meant as a compliment of the highest form. It is my failsafe word, my word that seems to just fit, and even if I look odd uttering it—I will be using it to my dying day.

Cool.

Cool emoticon

Cool emoticon (Photo credit: wstera2)

What one word do you use that gives you bliss?

Published in: on May 10, 2013 at 12:44 pm  Comments (65)  
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A Little Stream of Consciousness

Technicolor SA

Technicolor SA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Warning: No one can stop following my blog—I am at 470 and if I go down to 469 again I am going to get really upset and do something radical. Like start writing with my left hand (have you noticed a lot of leaders write with their left hand?) Or wear a hat. Or not put my mittens on when I go for my daily walk today – it is only going up to 29 degrees F here today; last year on this first day of spring it was 82 degrees. Okay, I know I am Canadian and supposed to measure the temperature in Celsius but I don’t. So there. How is that for being a rebel?

I am really trying to ignore my statistics, but some people have thousands of followers, so I would really like to keep my hundreds. My goal is to reach 500 by my birthday on April 21st—what do you think–am I dreaming in Technicolor?

I think it is a “hoot” that the people who subscribe to blogs on WordPress are dubbed “followers”. I have been thinking about starting my own religion (I would be very inclusive), so maybe this will give me a “congregation” of sorts.  Anyway, I don’t think of you as followers at all. I am grateful for each and every one of you who has subscribed to my blog.

And if you are wondering–yes, this is another one of my posts asking begging, sobbing, hoping for your help. Can you help me attain my goal of 500 before April 21st—although I really don’t know how, as most of you reading this are already subscribed. If you have any ideas, feel free to share them.

English: Flowers of Crown Daisy (Glebionis cor...

Flowers of Crown Daisy  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bliss is getting to the number 500+ before April 21st. I will keep you updated on my progress……..

Published in: on March 20, 2013 at 2:03 pm  Comments (74)  
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Spring?

Spiral Birds and Blooms: 2nd Chiyogami Series

Spiral Birds and Blooms (Photo credit: so_jeo)

1.

Mid-March hesitates

Lion yawning, lamb awaits

Spring plays hide and seek.

2.

Precipitation

Mixed snow and rain, icy cold

Where is soft sweet spring?

3.

True bliss is patience

Icicles will drip and melt

Giving way to blooms.

Published in: on March 15, 2013 at 7:41 pm  Comments (52)  
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Blissful Play

When was the first time you really felt like a grown up (if ever)?

Responsible Adult Behaviour I

Responsible Adult Behaviour  (Photo credit: monojussi)

Michelle is one curious humanoid. I like that she added (if ever) to her prompt today. Do we ever feel really grown up?

I know I am grown up, because I have grown up responsibilities. I own a home (along with the woman who holds our mortgage); I have a husband; I have kids; I work; and I don’t play enough.

Does being grown up mean we have lost the ability to play? I remember getting lost in the world of play—it was a real world where anything was possible. My dolls could be anything they wanted to be—they were only limited by my imagination. I used to love to use a hammer and nails and make inventions with whatever scraps I found in my dad’s garage—and those inventions were the stuff that made my dreams come true—contraptions that made no sense, but made sense to me.

Different types of stuffed toys

Different types of stuffed toys (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I also used to imagine at night, that the bed that I was on would take me on exotic trips—and I always wanted to have a favourite stuffed animal with me to go on the trip, and some food (usually in the form of crackers) on my bedside table I could grab in case we did not get back in time for breakfast the next morning. (To this day, I think that these night time adventures could be real, and have a package of saltines on my bedside dresser).

Reading was also part of my playing. I remember my brother reading poetry to me before I could read myself—I loved the words and where they could take me. And then when I was able to read myself, the journeys I could go on, and the people I could be in my imagination were boundless.

I want to take back my right to play. Sometimes I can relive those days of play when I create using paper and paste, or scrapbooking, or even making little vignettes throughout my house of objects I have.

 I think the very core of play is creativity, and I think that writing can be counted as play—those times when one is not sweating blood while creating (but even then it can be satisfying when you express something just the right way.) Writing–where you can put your imaginings on paper can be blissful play.

Do you think that writing can be considered playful bliss?

Published in: on March 6, 2013 at 1:45 pm  Comments (48)  
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A Rose by any other name…..

Homefront-USB-Stick (4GB)

Homefront- (Photo credit: THQ Deutschland)

 Prompt for the day: Explain why you chose your blog’s title and what it means to you. ~ Michelle

Michelle from WordPress is certainly a curious girl. Okay Michelle, this one is for you.

1. I chose “On The Homefront and Beyond” for my blog because it is the name of the weekly column I write for my hometown newspaper.

rose

rose (Photo credit: alice_ling)

2. To be honest, I did not choose the name totally by myself. When I started writing the newspaper column in 1998 I had a partner—she would write the column one week and I would write it the next. She chose the “On the Homefront” part which she said she stole from a friend. Since her friend lived nowhere near us and was unlikely to ever find out, we absconded with the name. I added “….and beyond” because I did not want to limit us to just topics having to do with “on the homefront”. My partner moved away and I have had the column solely to myself since 1999.

3. It has the word “home” in it, and that is one of my favourite words.

4. I am lazy and did not take the time to find another name for this blog.

5. I hope to publish a wildly popular and successful book called Tales from “On The Homefront and Beyond”. I hope to make millions. When this book is published I plan to put it on my bookshelf beside my book of poetry (which is still in my imagination) called “Poems” from a Poet of Little Merit.

6. I enjoy spellcheck continually trying to make me spell “homefront” as two words: home front.

Are you happy with the title of your blog? If you do not have a blog yet—what title would give you bliss? If you do have a blog—does the name of your blog give you bliss? (I have to stay with the program here: bliss is the topic of the year.)

Would You Find Bliss in Reincarnation?

Hindus believe the self or soul (atman) repeat...

Hindus believe the self or soul (atman) repeatedly takes on a physical body. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Today’s prompt from Michelle at WordPress~

Reincarnation: do you believe in it?

I don’t know.  In the last little while a fellow blogger (grosenberg Feb 7, 2013) talked about the fact that “I don’t know” is one of the most honest answers you can give. And I agree. When it comes to reincarnation, I just don’t know. I don’t discount it. I don’t not believe in it. But I also do not know if it is something that really happens.

I sometimes wonder why we are supposed to be faith based. Why do we have so many unanswered questions? If they were answered, would be sealing our fate as Adam and Eve did?

Reincarnation has a number of synonyms: rebirth, re-creation, reawakening, restoration, re-embodiment, recreation (I assume this is the same as re-creation, and not referencing activities such as baseball or beer drinking).

 Definitions generously provided by my Encarta Dictionary for reincarnation say that “in some systems of belief, the cyclic return of a soul to live another life in a new body”; “ a person or animal in whose body somebody’s soul is born again after he, she, or it has died”; or more simply “a reappearance of something in a new form”.

I like to keep an open mind. And I do not like to discount other’s beliefs unless they are harmful. Reincarnation is a religious concept as well as philosophical, and in those terms I am not prepared to reduce it to something I do not believe in.

Français : L'actrice américaine Shirley MacLai...

Shirley MacLaine 1987. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I find the concept fascinating. That we have more than one chance at life. Different chances, different experiences. If I have been reincarnated, I wonder what my other lives were—and why I don’t remember them.  Shirley MacLaine does. Maybe we should ask her.

Would you find bliss if in fact we knew there was such a thing as reincarnation?

A memorial of sorts

One Room School

One Room School (Photo credit: W9NED)

This is a shortened version of my column for the newspaper:

Sometimes writers need prompts. Something to get the juices flowing. This morning a prompt from WordPress read: “A place from your past or childhood, one that you’re fond of, is destroyed. Write it a memorial.”

And do you know what immediately came to mind? The one room school house that I attended for the first four years of my school life. It was called  Zion — and yes, we walked about a mile and a half to school (it seemed like five miles) but not in bare feet, or in ten feet of snow.

I cannot remember when the school was torn down, but whenever I pass the spot where it stood, a wave of nostalgia passes over me. I wish it were still standing, though if it were, it would probably have been turned into someone’s residence as so many of the smaller schools have been. Students who attended these schools were eaten up by either regional or town schools, but their experiences at the one room schools would never be lost.

I loved and hated that school. We were exposed to such a variety of kids that it really did stand us in good stead for a life that is made up of all kinds of people, and not just kids our own age. You learned how to cope, how to get along, and you learned that life was not always easy.

What I loved about the school was the fact that we were exposed to a unique learning experience. We learned our lessons, but were able to “listen in” on the lessons of the other grades, and if you were an eager student you garnered an education above your years. We did a lot of things together as a whole school. We played baseball together; we had a school choir where we competed at a yearly concert; we practiced for the yearly Christmas concerts together; and we exchanged names for Christmas gifts.  You were just as likely to end up with some grade eight boy’s name, as the girl who sat next to you in your grade.

What I hated about the school were the things most students would hate about any school—if you were picked on, or you were not quite up to snuff in sports, or if you were the teacher’s pet. But those were all valuable learning experiences as well, if not the most pleasant. (I still remember being taught how to make an iceball—a snowball with ice in the middle that hurt like heck if you got hit with it.)

One of the best things about a one room school for me was that the teacher had to divide her time among all the grades, so when she was not teaching you, you had all the time in the world to do your lessons, then read as much as you wanted. Since I loved to read, this was a real bonus for me.

After grade four,  I was moved to a regional school and put in a classroom of kids who were my own age. It was quite a transition. We had a teacher who was available to us all throughout the day, which was a good thing, but left little time to be on your own.

I am glad that I got to experience both ways of being educated. I would never give up the things I learned at the one room school house. To this day, I miss being able to see a piece of my history. The school was the same one my parents and aunts and uncles attended, and even some of my grandparents.  It was the true essence of community.

I will never bid a fond farewell to Zion—it will always be fraught with sadness.

Where is the bliss? Not in the fact that the school was torn down, but in the fact that it was a piece of my history. What piece of your history is missing, but still remembered?

Where Is The Bliss In That?

[denial]

[Denial] (Photo credit: Shovelling Son)

Write you own eulogy is the WordPress daily prompt today. And to that I say, bah humbug! Where is the bliss in that? Of course I want to be remembered but I am not ready to take my leave just yet.

I stick firmly to the premise that I am middle-aged even though if I am really middle-aged the researchers had better come up with something that keeps us living well past 100 with our minds intact and not too many aches and pains.

A friend of mine asked me yesterday how I am going to celebrate my birthday this year as it is one of the milestone birthdays that end in a 0. It is also a milestone for other reasons, but I am so in denial about that.

I do not read magazines that are aimed at Boomers or Zoomers or whatever they are called these days. They look like perfectly good and innocent magazines, but I am not ready yet. I have not achieved all I want to achieve.  I have not been there, nor done enough of that to warrant reading a magazine for people who have reached a modicum of success. (Debbie, if you are reading this–I read all the other mags you give me and John reads Zoomer).

Crazy Woman Creek

Crazy Woman Creek (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Am I in denial?

Completely.

Am I going to write my eulogy?

Absolutely not (though I read those of others who took up the challenge and they were wonderful—they are obviously more mature than I, or took the exercise as a challenge and not an affront.)

I read the following quote on Redmontfamily.com, and though it does not totally mirror my attitude, I do like the fact that I have supposedly reached the age of discretion and discernment–the discarding part is still to come, as are the expensive toys:

“Welcome to an age of discretion, discernment and discarding of outmoded ideas.
Being over 40 doesn’t mean being over the hill.
Rather it means that you’ve climbed further up the mountain.
So your view of life is more expansive,
the knowledge gained is more extensive,
and your toys are more expensive.”

Are you in denial or more mature than I and made peace with your age? (Actually it is not my age I mind, it is the labels and expectations that go with it.)

Published in: on January 25, 2013 at 4:14 pm  Comments (64)  
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