Simple is not Easy

margaritas

margaritas (Photo credit: M. Martin Vicente)

Simple is not easy

Told someone yesterday to be happy ~

To fake it for a while until the feeling was authentic;

They looked at me as if I had fallen off the turnip truck

They could not fathom happiness

It was not within their current vocabulary

They could not grasp the concept.

As I said

Simple is not easy

Happiness sounds simple

It is not easy.

What do you think about happiness? Sounds simplistic—but it is hard work I think.

This post was inspired by Margarita who said this to me in response to my post Let It Be:

Dearest LouAnn, “simple” and “easy” are not synonyms, in my experience. Just because a concept is simple, does not mean it’s easy to execute. Once I released myself from that perception (simple=easy), it was easier to let things be. xoxoM

Published in: on August 24, 2013 at 10:30 am  Comments (38)  
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This Night Stands On Its Own Merits

heart with smile

heart with smile (Photo credit: Pan.101)

“You cannot judge the prudence of an action by the results.” ~ Henrietta Ann Klauser, Put Your Heart on Paper

After Klauser makes that statement she follows it with this truth: “What a hard truth and profound statement. It will give you great power when you are at peace with that.”

Her book, “Put Your Heart on Paper”, is one of my favorites, but I must say that this statement particularly resonates with me. I hate to do something and not realize the results. I want to know that my effort was not in vain. That the work or time I have put into something counts. But even if we cannot see the results, or the results are different than we anticipated, Klauser want us to know that the effort was worth it.

She tells of an insight she received from a friend when she told him the story of staying up one night when she was at university to comfort a friend in crisis even though she should have been studying. She told him that if she still passed the test than the time spent with her friend was worth it. The insight she received was this: “No, whether you pass or not, this night stands on its own merits.”

Those simple words, “…this night stands on its own merits” is one we can learn from. The action is what was important, not the outcome or what we would consider the reward. The reward in this case is that the friend was helped through her crisis and that was the important thing—the thing that had merit

I find myself always looking to do the thing that is worthwhile—the thing where the outcome will be worth the effort put into it. Now I am thinking that the process may be the key and that the time and effort put into something is worth merit, not just the product.

I seem to be quite serious of late, sort of giving myself some “self-talks”. Will let you know if they are successful, but I guess I should keep in mind that the process of working things out is just as important as the end result.

(I am hedging my bets and buying a lottery ticket too though).

Bliss is the journey as much as the destination. What do you think?

 

Simply True

Truth

Truth (Photo credit: d4vidbruce)

As this month of writing a  poem a day winds down, I am both going to be relieved and miss coming up with something that does not have paragraphs and specific rules. Of course I will continue to write my rendition 0f poetry, but not so on demand. My offering today is simple ~ it came out of nowhere ~ but I hope it goes somewhere:

Simply True

revenge: forgiveness

jealousy: trust

greed: generosity

for every bad

there is a good

Bliss comes from the realization that bad stuff has as its opposite, good stuff. It may not be profound, but it is true–do you agree?

Published in: on April 28, 2013 at 12:55 pm  Comments (33)  
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A Little Sunday Zen

Cover of "Chop Wood, Carry Water"

Cover of Chop Wood, Carry Water

There is a famous story in the Zen world that Dinty W. Moore (every time I write his name I think of baked beans), author of the “Mindful Writer” includes in his book. On page 118 to be exact. It goes as follows:

The student, newly arrived at the monastery, asks the master, “What work will I do as I seek enlightenment?”

The master replies. “Chop wood, carry water.”

“And what work will I do once I achieve enlightenment?”

“Chop wood, carry water,” replies the master.

A simple bit of Zenism, and as with all in the Zen world, it needs an explanation in order to understand it. According to Moore, “writers write”. They may do a myriad of other things: walk their dog, go to work, take meetings, care for their family—but in the end he says, “…any writer, even a writer who has published….and won two dozen awards, gets up in the morning knowing what must be done. The words must be chopped and the sentences carried.”

Woods

Woods (Photo credit: @Doug88888)

I think the famous story in the Zen world has a larger meaning. It can apply to all things we do in life—we must “chop wood, carry water”—we must continue what we are doing; we must not be satisfied; we must carry on. Our job is really never done, and when we think it is, we have in essence, stopped living.

It is a story of purpose, and without purpose there is no need to “chop wood, carry water.”

My bliss today is to keep chopping wood and carrying water. What about you?

Space to Think

I have a very serious addiction. I love magazines–their stories, the hints they provide on making your life the “best ever” particularly at Christmas time, the fashions, and yes, even the ads–which if you pay attention are quite artistic.

A Christmas Snow

A Christmas Snow (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I woke up very early this morning and did not want to crawl out from under my warm covers, so I picked up a copy of “Real Simple” from my bedside table, and found these words from photographer, Cig Harvey, in answer to the question: “What makes your life simple?”

He said: ” When I’m driving in the snow, I often think about the relief and joy that I’ll feel when I get home. I love the way the world falls quiet during a snowstorm and the house becomes almost a separate planet, with the space to think, create, organize and reflect.”

I love these sentiments. Although we have had no snow yet this season (a few flakes does not count) I await the first lovely snow with much anticipation. I still love the snow (though I wish it would avoid the roads) and the cozy feeling you get looking out your front window while holding a warm drink, with the space to think and reflect.

Published in: on December 6, 2012 at 11:25 am  Comments (63)  
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