Wonder as I Wander

 “I wonder as I wander out under the sky….” ~ John Jacob Niles

These are the first words to a Christmas carol that was beautifully rendered by Niles. His words are magical in that they capture two solitary activities: wondering and wandering.

Wandering is a pastime that has its own rhythm. True wandering is not valid if you are merely strolling to the letter box to post mail or to the store to get some milk.  The purpose of wandering is to roam with no purpose other than to wonder.  And wondering is an amazing and active thing—it clears out the labyrinth of worry in your mind—putting your thoughts in order while marvelling at the curiosity that is life.

When I was about ten I was allowed to wander from my little house in the country to the creek, or as we called it then, the “crick”. There was no purpose in going to the crick other than to sit on its banks and ponder; or throw stones in the still waters and watch concentric circles form and then disappear. It was on those wanderings that I solved a lot of my problems.

Under the open country sky, I was free to let my thoughts form, to mull them around, then let them go like a kite set free to wander the earth at will.

My goal is to return to my wandering and wondering days—days that seemed endless; days when imagination found animals and objects in the clouds; princes in frogs;  freedom in gliding across a frozen pond in new skates; and the thrill of opening a new book—a new adventure.

I wonder as I wander in my mind….and sometimes my problems just disappear for a while and I am a creature of the earth; a soul bound by nothing; a brown bird pecking at the snow for a seed, and finding one, fulfilled.

Published in: on February 4, 2014 at 3:30 pm  Comments (33)  
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~ OF TWO MINDS ~

Of two minds. I seem to be of two minds about most things. Sitting on the fence is not comfortable—being able to see both sides makes decision-making difficult. Yet, I would not want to be any other way. So very sure of my opinions that I cannot see around my blinders.

But being of two minds makes everything take that little bit longer. Weighing the consequences of my choices; the pros and cons; but ultimately, doing the right thing wins out—even if it is not the easiest path; the most economical; the best way to further myself.

Confuscious Down Under

Confuscious Down Under (Photo credit: cogdogblog)

Confucius is purported to have said: “The man of wisdom is never of two minds; the man of benevolence never worries; the man of courage is never afraid.”

I understand what he is saying, but I believe that reaching wisdom for most of us does not come naturally—it is a process of growing up, experiencing life, and maturing into our wisdom. Perhaps someday I will be wise enough to know the right answer without hesitation; without conferring; without pondering—but I have not reached that height yet.

Doing the right thing seems like such an easy choice—but deciding on what the right thing is, sometimes takes a journey—a journey of discovery; a journey of mistakes and errors; a journey where sometimes the road has no turning.

Being of two minds does mean one is two-faced. It does not mean that your opinion is out waving in the wind waiting for the strongest storm to take it over. The goal of “being of two minds” is to reach the state of wisdom; to reach the best decision, not the most convenient; to reach for the moon while not dismissing the stars.

This post was inspired by lillianccc from the blog: High, High, Higher, who is leaving her job and going to grad school. And while she is sure of her path, she is starting to miss what she is leaving behind. That is normal. When we say good-bye to something, it is very human to have doubts; to wonder if we made the right decision; to perhaps mourn the loss of something known for the unknown.

She is leaving her job for many reasons, one being that she felt she was not making enough of a contribution—that her hard work was being wasted. I know exactly how that feels. How many times have we put our heart and soul into something for it to come to naught? I am starting on such a project in the next few days—there will be some hard work and time spent doing unpleasant things, and the outcome is questionable. The outcome could make all the difference, or once again, dash hopes. But that is life—and not to take on the project, not to do it, would mean that failure is a sure thing.

So, as I gear up to do the hard thing—I am of two minds—but the one who will be victorious is the one that chooses the hard path, that it may smooth the way for the future.

Are you of two minds? Or do you agree with Confucius—that we should know the right path and take it without assessing, evaluating, debating, and yes, brooding a bit?

 

Published in: on August 31, 2013 at 1:25 pm  Comments (42)  
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