Nothing New Under the Sun

English: A natural sponge, to be used in house...

A natural sponge named LouAnn.(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

*“Unique situations require unique solutions.” -Nnamonu Tochukwu.

My question is ~ are there unique solutions to situations that are not unique?

I could make the argument that there are no unique situations—just the same dramas, comedies, and circumstances on a roller coaster ride with twists and turns that at first make them seem unique. But on further investigation, they are not.

What is the old line—there is nothing new under the sun?

I have taken note, in my quest to find bliss, that some days it is within my grasp, some days I possess it, but other days it is just that millimetre too far away. I understand that what is happening in my life directly affects my bliss, and that I am not yet evolved enough to be able to sweep  the things that interfere with it to the wayside when a solution is not readily available.

I am a sponge. I take in what is around me, and it becomes part of me. I must learn to be the opposite without losing my compassion. What is the opposite of a sponge? I just Googled that question and there was “no word found”. I need to be less porous and more impermeable without losing my humanity.

Big Possibilities

Big Possibilities (Photo credit: Melody Campbell)

Is that possible?

*Found this quote on the blog Wise Counsel ~ http://teeceecounsel.wordpress.com/2013/02/01/uniqeness-quote-unique-solutions/

Gifts ~ Is It the Thought that Counts?

Pile of gorgeous gifts

Pile of gifts (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Care to appear happy…..” ~ Saint Therese

Do you ever buy yourself Christmas presents? I do. One of my presents to myself this year is Gretchen Rubin’s book “Happier at Home”. I loved her first book, “The Happiness Project” so thought I would get this sequel of sorts.

In the December chapter of her book, she gives two particularly good pieces of advice. The first is taken from her favourite “obsession”, Saint Therese of Lisieux, whose philosophy entailed taking “care to appear happy and especially to be so.” (p. 116) This  quote from the Saint who died young of tuberculosis, tells me that being happy is something we can conjure up, something that is within our control, no matter how we feel. We can be happy (or at least appear so) if we set our mind to it for the sake of others.

The other piece of advice Gretchen provides in this chapter is extremely timely.  She says that Saint Therese emphasizes “the importance of accepting gifts in the spirit in which they are offered, instead of responding to the gift itself,” which is just another way to “care to appear happy.”

This takes us out of the equation and puts the emphasis on the person who chose the gift for us and the thought and trouble that went into the choice. I love this! I have been guilty in the past of just looking at how I will use a gift, or what I will wear it with, or whether I can keep it alive, or any number of other things, rather than the fact that the gift is an offering of love, thoughtfulness, kind-heartedness and consideration.

So, this holiday season, I am determined to take the time to respond to the spirit in which the gift is given rather than the gift itself.

Gretchen does draw the line at passive-aggressive gifts though. She says that sometimes the spirit in which a gift is given is not all that kind—for example, when someone is gifted running clothes, a certificate to a spinning class and an electronic calorie counter—a none too subtle message is being sent.

I myself would be very unhappy to receive gifts that emphasize “organizing your life”—I am afraid I would have trouble accepting them in the spirit they are given—since that spirit would be a little annoying. I do not need a “teaching moment” gift. (Pearls would be nice though–a single black pearl on a silver chain in particular if anyone is wondering–this is useless as my husband does not read my blog. It is something that he is going to get around to some day. That day has not yet come.)

Have you ever received a gift that you had to remember the spirit in which it was given, because otherwise you would wonder what the heck the person was thinking?

 

~ Back for a Minute ~

English: The minute hand on 0

The minute hand  (Wikipedia)

This sums up my philosophy of life:

“LEARN THE RULES THEN FORGET THEM!”  ~ Basho

Painfully, this week I am following the rules.

Published in: on November 29, 2012 at 1:24 pm  Comments (41)  
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A Profundity

path path path

(Photo credit: hockadilly)

We need a path

before we can make

the journey……

Published in: on November 19, 2012 at 4:39 pm  Comments (26)  
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Day Ten ~ 200 Words

English: There are no symbols that represent s...

English: There are no symbols that represent skepticism. This is one symbol that can be used to represent skepticism, skeptical inquiry, critical thinking, critical inquiry, and truth-seeking. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Without sacrificing skepticism, I’ve tempered my cynicism, and my world is a little more magical as a result.” – Matthew Hutson

Hutson is the author of “The 7 Laws of Magical Thinking”. I discovered the book sitting on a shelf at the library and was intrigued by the title.   But I was not sure I was committed to reading it until I scanned the second last line (quoted above) in the final chapter. Then I knew I had to read it.

Magical thinking gets me through unstable times. It is the ability to think that there are ways, albeit unknown, to bring back balance. We have all been made aware that “life is not fair” but magical thinking turns that cliché on its head. It provides us with hope and something to believe in outside of  ourselves (even if we are not sure what that is).

Hutson concludes that while magical thinking did not help him discover the meaning of life, it “refined” his thinking about how to  create meaning and how to get out of his head and “see the big picture”, all the while delighting in the “ineffable.”

Succumbing  to the indefinable, we become  more highly evolved.