Blissful Play

When was the first time you really felt like a grown up (if ever)?

Responsible Adult Behaviour I

Responsible Adult Behaviour  (Photo credit: monojussi)

Michelle is one curious humanoid. I like that she added (if ever) to her prompt today. Do we ever feel really grown up?

I know I am grown up, because I have grown up responsibilities. I own a home (along with the woman who holds our mortgage); I have a husband; I have kids; I work; and I don’t play enough.

Does being grown up mean we have lost the ability to play? I remember getting lost in the world of play—it was a real world where anything was possible. My dolls could be anything they wanted to be—they were only limited by my imagination. I used to love to use a hammer and nails and make inventions with whatever scraps I found in my dad’s garage—and those inventions were the stuff that made my dreams come true—contraptions that made no sense, but made sense to me.

Different types of stuffed toys

Different types of stuffed toys (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I also used to imagine at night, that the bed that I was on would take me on exotic trips—and I always wanted to have a favourite stuffed animal with me to go on the trip, and some food (usually in the form of crackers) on my bedside table I could grab in case we did not get back in time for breakfast the next morning. (To this day, I think that these night time adventures could be real, and have a package of saltines on my bedside dresser).

Reading was also part of my playing. I remember my brother reading poetry to me before I could read myself—I loved the words and where they could take me. And then when I was able to read myself, the journeys I could go on, and the people I could be in my imagination were boundless.

I want to take back my right to play. Sometimes I can relive those days of play when I create using paper and paste, or scrapbooking, or even making little vignettes throughout my house of objects I have.

 I think the very core of play is creativity, and I think that writing can be counted as play—those times when one is not sweating blood while creating (but even then it can be satisfying when you express something just the right way.) Writing–where you can put your imaginings on paper can be blissful play.

Do you think that writing can be considered playful bliss?

Published in: on March 6, 2013 at 1:45 pm  Comments (48)  
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V ~ is for Vicarious

Trixie Belden and the Secret of the Mansion, t...

Trixie Belden and the Secret of the Mansion, the first Trixie Belden mystery (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“If a movie is really working, you forget for two hours your Social Security number and where your car is parked. You are having a vicarious experience. You are identifying, in one way or another, with the people on the screen.” ~ Roger Ebert

I have a rather positive outlook on vicarious experiences. Though I may not have experienced something firsthand, that does not mean the experience is not worthy.  In fact vicarious experiences can be just as satisfying. Is that not what we do when we get lost in a good movie as Ebert so ably puts it, or better yet, when we read a book?

I remember as a young girl reading the adventures of Trixie Belden and Nancy Drew, and living them in my imagination. The things that they dealt with did not happen in my “real” life, but I was richer, as was my imagination, for having experienced them vicariously.

I sometimes live through the tales my friends tell of their adventures, their travels, and their creative acts. And by listening to them, my attention is rapt, and their memories become not my memories, but an open door to things I have not had the chance to do or create.

Some of the synonyms I found for vicarious are not at all how I define it.  The words second-hand, displaced, remote, indirect, removed or distanced do not play a part in my vicariousness.

To me, living vicariously opens up worlds that may not be available to me otherwise. It also provides an impetus to do the things that I find appealing. Sometimes living out something in your imagination translates itself into action.

I have lots of things on my life list (as opposed to my bucket list which sounds a little too final to me) that I want to do: travel, publish a book, learn to golf and play tennis, get involved in more community activities—and as I work on this list, I derive pleasure from those who do travel extensively, write books, play the games I want to play, and join the activities I want to take part in. It is part of the learning process—it is all part of my life research.

I think of  “living vicariously” as a practice run wherein I am identifying what it is I want to accomplish.

1966 cover of the revised version of The Secre...