And The Winner is ~ Part 2

English: Saying grace before carving the turke...

Saying grace before carving the turkey at Thanksgiving dinner in the home of Earle Landis (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Never imagined I would be blogging for a whole week about Thanksgiving — bet you can’t wait to see what I will do for Christmas!

I have all the fixings for Thanksgiving now–got the whipping cream yesterday for the pumpkin pie, my son is home for a few days from college (real hugs are so much better than phone calls and emails), my guests are invited, and I am going to do a little of the preparation work today (make a spice cake with cream cheese icing, cook my new recipe up for sweet potatoes and apples with a yummy sounding syrup, make the “green stuff” up which consists of pistachio pudding, cool whip, pineapple, and something else–better consult the recipe. Got those cute little red potatoes to roast as that is how my youngest son loves them, and stuffing (already in the turkey if you remember from a previous post) for my oldest son, who just loves the stuff.)

This last sentence begs the question–can you have brackets within brackets? But I am not going to think on it too hard.

As promised, here are a few more of the winners who created a better ending for this Thanksgiving poem of sorts by Unknown or Anonymous, if you will. First the poem or as I like to refer to it–the poemette:

May your stuffing be tasty
May your turkey be plump,
May your potatoes and gravy
have nary a lump.
May your yams be delicious
and your pies take the prize,
and may your Thanksgiving dinner
stay off your thighs!

The first is from a favourite blogger friend of mine Julie, who instead of giving the poem an ending, gave us her rendition of anonymous:

jmgoyder said:

I am ominous
but not anonymous

diannegray said: 

and may your Thanksgiving dinner be full of cute guys

lillianccc said:

May your yams be delicious,
And your pies take the prize,
May you loosen your belt after dinner,
With a big satisfied sigh.
:)

Scribbler said:

May your Thanksgiving Dinner stretch your Levi’s.

Then thinking this was as mean as the one in the poem, she added:

May your Thanksgiving mesmerize.

She ended with: May your Thanksgiving create family ties!

thehealthywarrior said:

May your yams be delicious
and your pies take the prize,
May your Thanksgiving Dinner
Be as delicious as the expression in your eyes.

And last but not least:

 mybeautfulthings said: 

(May your Thanksgiving) be a feast for your eyes!

Thank you to everyone who submitted your rhyming thoughts. You are my heroes.

Thanksgiving (Heroes)

Thanksgiving (Heroes) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I am now going to go chop and peel and bake and swipe a taste or two of cream cheese icing (the proven breakfast of champions!)

Published in: on October 6, 2012 at 9:59 am  Comments (28)  
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A Quote of Great Seriousness

Pen Name

Pen Name (Photo credit: diverter)

I seem to be on a Thanksgiving roll this week, so to continue the tradition, I have decided to quote a source that seems to have endless things to say. Unknown  and his brother Anonymous are so prolific~I seriously do not know how they found the time to comment on everything under the sun. Real soup to nuts guys.

I assume Anonymous and Unknown are male because they probably said a few things that their wives would not have approved of, and could not come up with a nom de plume or pen name  fast enough to cover their (mis)steps.

In honour of  Thanksgiving, Author Unknown had this little ditty up his sleeve and produced it I am sure to much fanfare. I hear Anonymous was jealous that he did not come up with it first. Without further ado:

Thanksgiving Dinner

Thanksgiving Dinner (Photo credit: The Vault DFW)

May your stuffing be tasty
May your turkey be plump,
May your potatoes and gravy
have nary a lump.
May your yams be delicious
and your pies take the prize,
and may your Thanksgiving dinner
stay off your thighs!

I understand that these words have no equals in the annals of literature, and should be praised as bon mots–but I do find the last line  a bit of a cruel way to go into this season of feasting.

I would like to challenge you, dear readers, to coming up with a less cruel way to end Unknown’s little poem, and I will include them in a post on this blog tomorrow.