~ Just a Quick Thought ~

English: Crabgrass Source Richard Arthur Norto...

English: Crabgrass Source Richard Arthur Norton (1958- ) archive (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I pulled this little thought out of a paragraph in a post I wrote last October called “The Grass is Not Always Greener”. You are invited to go read the whole thing by clicking on the Archives for October 2011, or you can just “enjoy” this alone.

The First Law of Living states that “As soon as you start doing what you always wanted to be doing, you’ll want to be doing something else.” I have a bone to pick with this one—it is a sort of the “grass is always greener on the other side” or as Erma Bombeck would say: “the grass is always greener over the septic tank” type of thinking.

Gazing wistfully or wishfully over the fence, we have to remember that crabgrass is also green.

I personally have no problem with crabgrass—without it, I would have no lawn.

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47 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. When we bought our first house, and I was completely lawn-ignorant (I don’t know much more, now, however) …. I thought we should care for the lawn by sprinkling weed killer. Bought a spreader, and the weed killer and covered every square inch of our new lawn with the powdery stuff. Well, you guessed it, before very long we had an entire lawn of dirt. Anything green was weeds. What a mess I made! :)

    • live and learn as they say, but why does it have to be so hard sometimes, though brown is a nice shade

  2. You are stunning!

    • in a good way? cause there is also stunning in a bad way (lol)

      • IN A GOOD WAY!!!

      • that is a good thing–I knew from you it would be a good thing

  3. I’ve always wondered why crabgrass and clover aren’t held in as high esteem as Kentucky bluegrass. I guess there is an hierarchy in the grass world as in everything else.

    Maybe what we think we want is not always what we are destined to have or do…mankind is always searching to fill the void or if you are a spiritual person, finding the path God has chosen for you.

    • your thoughts were much better than my thought Peg–start a blog – a hierarchy in the world of grass (lol)

  4. Good old Erma Bombeck. I miss her sense of humor.
    After this year’s drought I’d say be thankful you have grass! I’m with you, a little crab grass here and there can really green it up! Haha!

  5. love crab grass and weeds. We have loads of it and the weeds sprout lovely flowers all over the place :)

  6. Well…. of course this triggered another music moment for me…. I hope some one else remembers Allen Sherman… He also sang “Hello Muddah, Hello Faddah”
    Check out: Here’s to the Crabgrass…

    http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/a/allan_sherman/heres_to_the_crabgrass.html

  7. Oh… and Erma Bombeck….. I have all of her books…. awesome and so funny.

  8. Loved that Erma Bombeck book – I think we have it on a shelf somewhere.

    I’m lucky to have married an extreme pragmatist who is always happy with what we have, and understands the meaning of having enough instead of having it all. He always says that weeds are green too, therefore our lawn looks fine. I’ve become more like him in my thinking, and it makes me a happier person.

    And you should see our septic bed – there is some high test grass growing there..

    • pragmatists are pretty easy to live with and you sound like you have a gem-
      we live in town, thus no septic beds anymore

  9. I’m like you.. crabgrass and weeds make up my lawn but every now and then buttercups and dandelions peek through and I realize it’s not too bad after all. :-)

    • I love dandelions – I used to give my mom bouquets of them and my sons did the same for me

  10. Such profound and insightful words coming from your viewers. Loved reading all of the comments. I never bought a Bombeck book but that brings leads me to see about getting some used ones. Hey- they all read the same but did you know and I am sure that you do- that nice hardbacks cost very litle as well. Just my little 2 cents and not quite on the subject.

    • The library is also a great place to get books, and you don’t have to find somewhere to store them (this coming from someone who has about a million books–but I make great use of my library) Used books is a great way to go too.

  11. Great post! :)

    • Thanks LuAnn–I just love that we have the same name–when I was growing up there were very few LouAnns–

      • I agree. I found very few with this name also.

  12. [...] in the early 60′s that kids (and adults)  enjoyed.  I have to give credit to LouAnn    http://onthehomefrontandbeyond.wordpress.com/2012/11/04/just-a-quick-thought/  Her post about crabgrass triggered one of my musical moments from the [...]

  13. LouAnn, So true. Our lawn has to be at least half crabgrass! And, I think this is probably true for a lot of people…

  14. I can’t say I’ve heard of crabgrass but it looks quite vibrant :)

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

  15. i’d like to believe that when we’re doing what makes us happy we’re happy! if the grass is greener on the other side maybe we need to look at ourselves rather than the grass? {and by “we” i mean “me” heh heh}

    • good point–I think you have hit on something here young lady

      • thanks, easier said than done though for sure ~

  16. That also reminds me of another quote – Weeds are flowers too!! That one makes me think of my lawn!!

  17. Reading this was a delight! You even embraced crabgrass. The world is richer than we imagine. What if we didn’t have a bone to pick with anyone?

  18. I always say that the grass is always greener on my side because I hire someone to tend to it ;)

  19. I broadcast clover seed in my crab-grass. It choked it out.
    I like that quote, and it’s true. The grass is greener over the septic tank. Sometimes the bad things that happen turn out for the best.

  20. Nothing wrong with crabgrass. Living in the country I am pleased to have my crabgrass, clover, wild daisies, and even the dandelions. With the drought our field was mostly green while everyone with grass had a dead yard.

  21. Crabgrass heaven…how wonderful

  22. “As soon as you start doing what you always wanted to be doing, you’ll want to be doing something else.”—Sadly, that is so often true. But if we’re wise and use our brains, we can hopefully realize that that ‘other’ grass maybe isn’t so green after all. :)

    Thanks for stopping by my blog. I appreciate it.

    • It is sad–but maybe we will stop and think that what we have is just as “green”. Enjoying your blog!


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